Miami Law Faculty Address President Trump's Executive Order in the Media

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Miami Law’s experts fielded queries from across the country addressing fallout from President Trump’s executive order banning entry to the United States from targeted countries. Professor Rebecca Sharpless was on the ground and on camera working with the local pushback to Miami-Dade Mayor’s sanctuary decision as well as putting together a Teach-In on the ban, with a noted Yale law professor, who was behind the ACLU’s successful stay; Professor Kunal Parker sussed out the law’s history and comparisons to “wet foot, dry foot,” and Professor Emeritus David Abraham unpacked the order via Skype from Leipzig, Germany.

Diaz-Balart is wrong that Trump immigration is like ‘wet foot, dry foot’ rule change I The Miami Herald

University of Miami immigration law professor Kunal Parker also said that Diaz-Balart’s comparison is invalid.

“President Trump’s order singles out certain countries for special treatment and specifically bans Syrian refugees from entering the United States,” he said. “Nationals of the seven targeted countries are henceforth going to be treated differently from immigrants and nonimmigrants from all other countries.”

 

Traveler Detentions and Court Clogs Flow From Trump Immigration Order I Daily Business Review

"This is a tough call because the executive, the president, enjoys extremely strong powers to exclude people or groups," said UM law professor David Abraham. "Some aspects of it will withstand a lawsuit because suspension of refugee admission is very likely within the president's authority. But whether he's devising a scheme that's intended to exclude on the basis of religion is a closer call."

 

End of ‘Wet-Foot, Dry-Foot’ policy puts all immigrants on equal footing I Southeast Texas Record

“Ending this policy puts Cubans on the same footing as all other migrants from the entire rest of the world,” David Abraham, professor at the University of Miami School of Law, told the Southeast Texas Record. “If you have no permission, no documentation to enter the country, you will be excluded, and if you enter surreptitiously, you may be detained before being removed.”

 

Cuba and the History of U.S. Immigration Policy I Cuba Journal

Kunal Parker, a professor at the University of Miami School of Law, says the 1965 (Immigration and Nationality Act) law ended “overt discrimination” in U.S. Immigration Policy. Parker says that people who are protesting Trump’s executive order probably “perceive what is happening as contrary to U.S. tradition since 1965.”

 

Trump’s immigration bean comparable to Obama’s Cuba rule change? I Politifact

University of Miami immigration law professor Kunal Parker also said that Diaz-Balart’s comparison is invalid.

"President Trump's order singles out certain countries for special treatment and specifically bans Syrian refugees from entering the United States," he said. "Nationals of the seven targeted countries are henceforth going to be treated differently from immigrants and nonimmigrants from all other countries."

 

BROADCAST HITS

 

Legal Experts: Gimenez Not Obligated To Obey Trump On Immigration Detentions I WLRN

But immigration law experts like the University of Miami's Rebecca Sharpless, president of the local chapter of the American Immigration Lawyers Association, insist the Mayor is not obligated to yield to Trump.

“The Mayor acted in haste," says Sharpless. "There is no dispute that these are requests, not mandates, by the federal government. The law in fact prevents the federal government from compelling states or cities to enact or administer a federal program.”

 

Universities urging international students, faculty to avoid traveling abroad I WPLG

UM Law students interviewed about Muslim ban executive order and Miami Law’s Teach-In. Included is information about the Immigration Clinic pro-bono assistance to the UM community with undocumented and Deferred Action of Childhood Arrivals status.

 

US Has Long History of Restricting Immigrants  I Voice of America

A professor at the University of Miami School of Law says the 1965 law ended “overt discrimination” in U.S. immigration policy. Kunal Parker is also the author of a book called “Making Foreigners: Immigration and Citizenship Law in America.”

Parker says that people who are protesting Trump’s executive order probably “perceive what is happening as contrary to U.S. tradition since 1965.”

 

Florida Universities react to Trump’s travel ban I WSVN

Local news station covers Miami Law’s Muslim Ban Teach-In.

 

Colleges brace to shield students from immigration raids I NBC Atlanta

 

Local politicians speak out on president’s travel band at anti-Trump rally I WSVN

Meanwhile, demonstrators gathered at the University of South Florida in Tampa, and at the University of Miami in Coral Gables, Yale Law Professor Muneer Ahmad led a teach-in.

“I think that there is a lot of worry and anxiety about the moment that we’re in,” said Ahmad. “They were worried about themselves, about their family members, about people in their community.”