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PREP Students Present Ethics Training to the Coral Gables Bar Association

Home   >  News   >  January 2012 Headlines   >  PREP Students Present Ethics Training to the Coral Gables Bar Association

Michael Greenfield and James Lechter, two student interns in Miami Law's Professional Responsibility and Ethics Program, recently presented a CLE ethics training for the Coral Gables Bar Association.

Under the supervision of Jan Jacobowitz, PREP's director, the students discussed the ethical implications of lawyer blogging and the use of office technology. The presentation explored some of the ethical dilemmas lawyers may encounter when using blogs including advertising, solicitation, and impugning the integrity of a judge. Also covered were issues posed by inadvertent disclosure through e-mails, public WiFi systems and shared computers. Lastly, the use of Facebook as an investigation tactic was addressed. The presentation led to a lively discussion among the seventy-seven lawyers and judges in attendance.

"The lawyers and judges in attendance were very engaged in the presentation, and it was both interesting and informative to hear their views on these cutting-edge issues," said Greenfield.

"It was an honor and privilege to present for such an esteemed group of legal professionals, including the author of one of the Judicial Ethic Advisory Committee Opinions used in our research," said Lechter.

Miami Law alumna, Jane Muir, who is President-Elect of the Coral Gables Bar Association, sent a thank you note, in which she reflected, "What an interesting and exciting subject and you developed it so well. We rarely see our members so engaged at luncheons."

The Professional Responsibility & Ethics Program was established in 1996 as an in-house program within the Center for Ethics and Public Service at Miami Law. The program has dedicated many student hours to public service and has educated thousands of members of the Florida Bench and Bar. As the students teach, they learn and quite often make a difference, prompting organizations to pause and reconsider their approaches to some of the toughest ethical dilemmas.