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PREP Students Conduct Ethics Training for the Bankruptcy Bar Association

Home   >  News   >  November 2011 Headlines   >  PREP Students Conduct Ethics Training for the Bankruptcy Bar Association

Patrick Poole and Shayla Waldon, interns from the Professional Responsibility and Ethics Program (PREP), recently presented a CLE Ethics training for the Bankruptcy Bar Association in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. Under the supervision of Jan L. Jacobowitz, director of PREP, the interns presented hypothetical situations of a host of ethical dilemmas commonly confronted by bankruptcy attorneys.

The training discussed ethical issues involved in website advertising, solicitation of clients in chatrooms, bankruptcy competency, supervision, and disclosure requirements, and legal ethical issues arising from the use of Facebook for evidentiary purposes.

The hour-long training session involved active participation from members of the audience as well as from both the Honorable Raymond B. Ray and the Honorable John K. Olson of the U.S. Bankruptcy Court for the Southern District of Florida.

"The audience was actively engaged in the conversation," said Waldon.

"It was a great learning experience for me to hear how the judicial perspective compared to the practicing attorney's perspective on the ethical issues," said Poole.

President of the Bankruptcy Bar Association, Ileana Christianson, was also present at the training.

"It was great to see Ms. Christianson there, as she helped the audience become even more engaged in the conversation with her insights from personal experiences," said Waldon.

The Professional Responsibility and Ethics Program was established in 1996 as an in-house program within the Center for Ethics and Public Service at the University of Miami School of Law. The program has dedicated countless student hours to public service and has educated thousands of members of the Florida Bench and Bar. As the students teach, they learn and quite often make a difference, prompting organizations to pause and reconsider their approaches to some of the toughest ethical dilemmas.